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Yearly Archives: 2015

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A civic transportation hackathon will foster transportation innovation in one of the nation’s fastest-growing cities.

From March 20 to 22, Seattle techies and activists will gather to tackle transportation at Hack the Commute, a hackathon focused on spawning new ideas and tools that can ameliorate transportation woes amid an expanding urban population and constant construction.

“When we think about Seattle, we’re the nation’s fastest-growing large city,” said Chief Technology Officer Michael Mattmiller. “In the next 20 years, we’re going to grow by 120,000 people, 75 percent of them driven by high-tech jobs. In a city where we’ve already built up so many homes and infrastructure, it’s just not possible to expand our roads every time we see an increase in traffic. That means we need to make smarter transportation decisions.”

Between 80 and 100 coders, designers, data analysts and entrepreneurs are expected to participate in the free event, which is led by the city of Seattle and Commute Seattle. Participants will receive context for the types of problems that need solving, along with prizes and continued city engagement for the best ideas. They will form groups and hear from people like Alan Borning of the University of Washington, who will talk about making transit tech accessible for disabled riders; Brian DePlace from the Seattle Department of Transportation, who will talk about the impact of construction; and Aaron Brethorst, who maintains the popular OneBusAway app.

Judges will recognize the best work at the end of the event, and three winning teams will be invited back to City Hall on April 29 for a “championship round.” The top participants will also receive mentorship from the city so their efforts can be fostered for the greater good of urban commuters, and the winning team of the championship round will be recognized in a ceremony.

Candace Faber, event organizer and CEO of Whoa! Strategies, explained that hackathons embody a wide range, and this one is the most organized she’s been involved with.

“It expands the community we’re engaging with,” Faber said. “I think when we’re designing technology or policies, it can be very difficult to hear from a broader base of citizens, and so putting together an event like this allows us to put together a number of different voices and do so in a really curated, collective way.”

The city budgeted $30,000 to host the event. And beyond funding from the city’s IT department and Department of Transportation, companies like Microsoft, Amazon Web Services, Inrix, Pronto, Socrata and Walk Score will provide funding and data about Seattle transportation. Local startup Moz is physically hosting the event at its offices.

The city compiled what Faber called “a huge data set” using Socrata, which contains more than 100 data sets, APIs and additional resources that developers can access before, during and after the event. The city also created a community on Reddit where developers can plan and organize.

“We have a very engaged civic community here in Seattle, and we’re so fortunate to be a technology center where we have a high number of developers and those who think creatively about what data can enable,” Mattmiller said. “Those are just resources we’ll never be able to duplicate in the city.”

Colin Wood Colin Wood  |  Staff Writer


Colin has been writing for Government Technology since 2010. He lives in Seattle with his wife and their dog. He can be reached at cwood@govtech.com. He is also available on Google+, Reddit and Voat.

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Originally posted on Time Management Ninja

How long is your commute?

Have you considered how much time this adds up to over the course of a week?  A month?  The year?

Have you ever taken a job because of the commute?  Have you ever quit or turned down a job because of the commute?

This post is the result of a question I posed on Twitter the other day.  It got quite a bit of reaction.

The question was,

“How long would you commute for your perfect job?

Answers varied both in terms of commute and whether people already had their dream job.  One person said she would commute 2 hours each way for her dream job.  Another reported that they already had their dream job working at home for themselves.  (Commute Zero!)

How Long Is That Commute?

I am lucky.  (Or was it planned?)  I have a 5 minute commute to my current employer.  Yes, I commute only about 10 minutes each day.  That is both ways combined.

On the other hand, some of my co-workers commute 45-60 minutes each way.  It hits me sometimes after dinner that some of my friends are still driving home.  Wow.

Many people underestimate just how quickly their commute adds up.  Let’s take a simple example…

(We’ll use some basic assumptions: 8 hour workday, 5 day work week, 50 weeks a year)

This table that shows the difference between a short and long commute:

If you commute 45 minutes each way each day, you can see it adds up quickly.  You are commuting almost a full workday each week!

I ask, “What could you do with some of the 360 hours a year that you commute?”

Well, most of us cannot entirely avoid our commutes.  We need to go to work and earn a living.

So, then the question is… how are you using your commute?  Are you making use of and managing the time?

Time Managing Your Commute

Many people try to take advantage of their commute by either texting or talking on their phone.  I am not a big fan of either.  In fact, both are quickly becoming illegal in most states.  If you must talk on your cell phone, use a headset.

But, making lots of phone calls does not necessarily get much done.  In fact, most people that talk in their cars are not getting work done.  Let’s look at how you  can be more productive by managing your commute.

5 Ways to Time Manage Your Commute:

1 – Make Use of It

It amazes me that many people with long commutes do not use the time in any manner.  Even if you are driving there are great ways to use the time.

Audio books are a great way to learn something new while driving.  When I had a long commute, I used to listen to 3-5 audio books a week.  These days there are many easy ways to bring great audio with you.  You can rent books on CD, or you can download audiobooks or podcasts to your iPod.

If you commute by train or bus, you really do not have an excuse for not utilizing the time.  However, next time you are on the train, take the time to observe other passengers.  How many are doing anything productive?  If you ride the train you can read or even write.  You can do work while en-route your destination.

2 – Time Shift to Save Time

One of the best ways to time manage your commute is to avoid the rush.  If everyone else is driving to work at 8AM, what if you left at 7AM?  Would it cut your commute in half?  For some people it does.  Time shifting, or moving tasks to more opportune times, can save you considerably over the long run.  I know some co-workers who minimize their commute time by coming in at 6AM and leaving at 3PM.  Some companies not only support this type of schedule, they actively encourage it.

3 – Skip the Commute Sometimes

Another great way to minimize commute time is to skip it from time-to-time.  If your employer supports it, look at a partial work from home arrangement.  In today’s telecommuting world, more and more employers are doing this.  A word of caution, only do this if you can actually work from home.  If you do not have the proper environment or discipline, you are asking for trouble.

4 – Alternate Mode of Transportation

If you are facing a long commute and cannot get much done in the car, then consider an alternate means.  People who commute downtown have traded their drive for the train.  They now can reclaim many hours of productive time in their week.  Carpooling is another great option.

5 – Get a new commute

Some will call this one radical, but at what point does the great job become unbearable due to the commute?  If you are commuting over an hour each way, you may need to rethink your situation.  Maybe it is time to move closer to work.  Maybe it is time to find another job.  These extreme moves may not always be possible, but until you really consider them you will not know your options.

What About Your Commute?

So, what are you doing to manage your commute?

Are you happy with the amount of time you spend traveling each week?  Do you need to make a change?  Change what you do during your commute?

Or do you even need to change your location or job?

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Two commutes a day, ten a week, forty a month, about 440 times a year. If you commute 45 minutes to work, that is ninety minutes a day, 1,650 hours every four years!

You know those goals you’ve been meaning to achieve? Why not use this time to work on them! How you choose to use the time is as broad as your imagination.

So much of our commuting time now is spent as a negative experience, that it drains us for other activities in our day. When we use our commuting time to benefit ourselves and make accomplishments, it not only will benefit us, but you will see positive impacts at work, home and play!

Using the time to organize your day at work will help you to be more productive at work and less time will be spent away from home and play. The more you are able to achieve, the goals you have been putting off will no longer seem like clouds hanging over you, and will free you up to both mentally and physically.

If you have things to do for the day call into the office (on speaker phone) and go over things that will make your day at the office more organized. If you never have time to write, bring a tape recorder and narrate your stories in your car. If you’re into exercise, isometrics (muscle contractions held for a count of 10 and repeated; do not do this if you are hypertensive or have a heart disorder) are well-documented to work in developing muscle. There are, of course, books on tape and even courses on various subjects. Why not take the time to enrich your life.

The commute is also a great time to schedule the day or review how the day went. Whatever you choose to do, getting value out of the commute helps to change your attitude about the commute and relaxes you throughout the time because you are focused on something more interesting than counting the minutes or the traffic jams. So now, instead of a major block to living, the commute can actually become an opportunity to advance your life.

Think of ten activities that you can do during your commute, and prepare some of them ahead of time. This way if you don’t feel like doing one, you have another ready to go, even if it’s just as simple as listening to your favorite music. You won’t always want to read or listen to music, so you might be prepared to work on a puzzle or compose a letter or song in your head. Your commute is as open to possibilities as you are!

*Note: Please note that this article was incorrectly posted on some websites, the second line in the first paragraph should read “1,650 hours every four years!”.

About the Author:

Dr. M. Mastria has created a five step program titled, FIVE STEPS TO A BETTER COMMUTE which is available free on the Commuter-Assist website (http://www.Commuter-Assist.com).

Dr. Mastria is founder of Commuter-Assist, which publishes e-books, CDs and cassettes to help commuters get the most out of their commute and life in general. Dr. Mastria speaks, offers workshops, and consults to businesses. She also provides life, wellness, and business coaching to groups and individuals. To contact Dr. Mastria email info@Commuter-Assist.com or call 570-839-6394.

All content Copyright © 2006, Dr. Marie A. Mastria, CLC, PCC / Commuter-Assist.com. All rights reserved. You may copy or send it to family or friends who may benefit from it so long as the format and credits are intact. You have permission to publish this article electronically, free of charge, as long as the bylines are included and links are activated and maintained. A courtesy copy of your publication or link to website would be appreciated.

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Do you know a commuter who isn’t overextended because of the commute he or she must take to reach the office? Well then,you know someone who is using the tips outlined below. However they got there,any commuters who are at ease with their commute and not overextended because of the time and expense of the commute, has found the secrets to making the commute work for them. According to federal statistics, workers are making longer commutes than in the past. More people are traveling greater distances to work.
There are more cars on the road and public transportation is very crowded. Most people are resigned to the inconvenience and stress of long commutes. Others are willing to tackle the commute more aggressively. And that is the first key to saving some of the time, money and energy that a commute takes away.
Below are listed ten tips that may save you time, money and energy. Even using one or two of the tips will make a change in what you pay to live a distance from your work.
1. Make a plan. Think about what in the commute is taking your time, money and energy and do something about it. Commuting is expensive and might even be a major expense in your budget. This expense might lead to energy-sapping stress as you worry about the output of so much money. Taking steps to adjust this output will limit your energy and money concerns. How can this be done? You might share a ride with someone, carpool, vanpool bike, walk, or use Transit.
www.spcregion.org lists all these options and how to find a group
to share the experience with. There is
even an emergency ride home program that
helps put to rest the main f
ear of those who are thinking of
using alternatives to the
private car – what happens if t
here’s an emergency at home or I get sick at work. This
service provides a ride home for the low pric
e of registration. Even if you can’t always
use an alternative, you will get some relief if
you trade in your car at least part of the
time.
2. Assess your needs regularly. You might
have gotten into a rut that no longer works
for you. The greatest assessm
ent is around the job itself.
Does it still meet your
desires and requirements? Should you be th
inking of moving on to another company or
type of position?
The other assessment centers ar
ound your home location. Does it still serve you to be
living where you do and commuting? Often, af
ter a time, people find that moving so far
from their work is no longer what
they want. It is something
to assess from time to time.
3. Be prepared. Be ready to walk out t
he door without searching for car keys, airline
tickets, money. Some like to prepare the night
before, others over the
weekend. This is
an especially useful tip if you have children
to drop off at daycare. Getting the older
ones into the habit of preparing for themselv
es will lessen your time and energy output
even more.
4. Commuter’s needs change seasonally. Just
the awareness and acceptance of this
can have a positive impact on the energy ex
pended on commuting. So
me commuters
who normally fly to other cities or states fo
r work, use their cars or the train during the
winter months then switch to planes once the danger
of ice and snow is over.
5. Regeneration, daily, weekly and annually, is
important in the life
of the commuter.
Long distance commuting takes its toll on t
he body and soul just as it does on the
wallet, the car and the time of the commuter.
Taking an hour at t
he end of the day to
stretch, do light exercise and defuse by us
ing calming techniques, meditation and
relaxation are two, will help
regenerate the energy and
spirit. This is a good way to be
sure stress stays wit
hin manageable boundaries.
6. Make healthy choices about what you
do during the day. Packing lunches some of
the time puts you in control of what you
eat and, especially, portion size. Make the
choice to walk up the stairs or walk to a
distant bus stop. The
payoff for these small
choices will show in less stress
, more energy and even more money.
7. Use tools to make you more efficien
t. Scheduling is one that could be used more
effectively. Try scheduling
all your activities, professional and personal, on one
schedule. Also try estimating how long a partic
ular activity will take and block that time
out. This is an easy way to save time because we tend to complete a task within the
time allotted. Give it a lot of
time and it takes a lot, give it
a little time and it’s still done,
and just as well. Try it, you will be delighted.
8. Family and social time is necessary to
a happy life. It is not optional. If necessary,
pencil it into your schedule – and stick to y
our schedule. This one tip can have a great
impact on the health and well-being of your fa
mily as well as on your own health.
9. Corporations need to understand that
the employee who has the commute under
control is a better, more productive worker
than the one who comes in harried from the
stress of the commute. Those
corporations will make prov
isions for their commuting
employees because they value their work. Th
ink about talking to your employer about
this. If you are the employer,
think how effective this could be in increasing productivity.
10. Commuting is a choice that was m
ade sometimes very long ago. That choice
should be reconsidered periodically and whatev
er steps need to be taken must, for the
health of the commuter and all who are close to
him or her – family
, friends, employer.
Use these tips and see what happens to t
he negative effects of the commute. My
challenge to you is to make the commute in
to an activity that enhances your work and
personal life.
Dr. M. A. Mastria, CLC, PCC, is f
ounder of www.Commuter-Assist.com which
provides services and products for long di
stance commuters, their family and their
employers, so their time, energy and m
oney are not drained by the commute.
Reach her at info@commuter-a
ssist.com or 570-839-6394.

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The earth is warming and polar bears will be extinct in less than thirty years.
Agree or disagree.

Gay people should have the right to marry, just like heterosexual people do.
Agree or disagree.

Illegal aliens have a right to be in the Unites States and partake of our benefits and services.
Agree or disagree.

The shootings at the Grand Theatre in Lafayette, Louisiana, and the military facility in Chattanooga, Tennessee, show that gun control is necessary, regardless of the Constitution.
Agree or disagree.

Our military should be pulled out of the Middle East, once and for all.
Agree or disagree.

Our educational system needs revamping.
Agree or disagree.

The President of the United States is wrong.
Agree or disagree.

Rosie O’Donnell is wrong.
Agree or disagree.

There was a time when thoughtful people engaged in debate over issues of importance and even frivolous ones. We respected others’ opinions even when we did not agree with them. A good discussion was invigorating, not demeaning. And name calling was out of bounds.

The times have changed. Listen to talk radio or the television news stations and you will hear opponents called vile names and their characters attacked as frequently as their views are. This is considered entertainment by some. There’s even a name for the more extreme talk show hosts- “shock jocks”- and as we now know, at least one company contracted to have their host use “irreverent and controversial” speech as part of his services.

My concern, and I think many of yours, as well, is that this has become more the norm and less shocking. It has permeated how adults conduct themselves and civility has been lost in most areas of life.

Some complain that our children have lost manners and respect. I submit that we, as a population, young and old, have lost what was once taken for granted in our behavior with one another- kindness and the civility that makes for a gentle way of living.

But one person can make a difference. Here’s a short story of how one little boy changed his classmates, and so the world:

When he became old enough to understand and strong enough to accomplish it, I asked my son to begin holding the door for the person behind him and open it for those coming toward him. At first, he was pleased to get the “Thank you, what a gentleman!” But he soon began to see that others didn’t hold the door or went through the one he was holding without even a recognition that he was there.

He became dismayed, but I comforted him by telling him they probably didn’t know how to respond since it was so long ago that this had been done. With my encouragement, he continued to do this and to say “Thank you” when someone did something nice for him. Lo and behold, one day he came back from school and told me the children were holding doors for each other and saying “Thank you.”

A little thing, you say? I say it changed the world. His corner of the world, but the world nevertheless.

Now what about your world? Can you make it kinder, gentler, more civil simply by changing your actions toward others? I think you can. I think you can bring all this into a world that has become mean, rude and frightening. Just by changing your words, your attitude, your intentions.

This is what I think will move us toward that better way of living:

• Accept that others may have an opinion that differs from yours and that it doesn’t make them evil, stupid, wiser or better. It’s probably that their experiences have influenced their thinking, just as your experiences have influenced your thoughts.

• You can disagree without attacking the other person’s integrity.
• Be careful of how much news and talk radio you partake of. It dulls the senses, makes us think cruelty is “normal” and desensitizes us to things which should always outrage us. It also makes devils out of those who disagree with us.

• Be careful of “political correctness.” I think it has done more to promote prejudice and dullness of thought than anything else in the many years past. It is used to block critical thought and discussion because no one wants to be called a “bigot.”

• Keep close to your heart the way you wish the world to be. That is what you will express.

• Do unto others what you would have them do to you. It may not be that person who reacts in kind, but the next one may be the one.

And being a commuter, this can make all the difference in how the commute affects you and your life. Never be too hurried to do a kindness or be polite. It will lessen your stress, increase your healthiness and leave a bright mark on your world.

If you don’t believe me, just try it for a week and see how good you feel.

Be well,

Dr. M.
Go now and have your copy of Conquer the Commute: Tools for the Road and Life downloaded to your computer at:
> www.ConquertheCommute.com <

About Dr. Marie Mastria
Dr. Mastria works with wellness and health issues. Call or email to discuss working with her.

Get “Conquer the Commute: Tools for the Road and Life” at
www.conquerthecommute.com. A complete manual and workbook to make the commute easier and your life better.
Dr. Mastria is founder of Commuter-Assist.com, which publishes e-books, CDs and cassettes to help commuters get the most out of their commute and life in general. Dr. Mastria speaks, offers workshops, and consults to businesses. She also provides life, wellness, and executive and business coaching to groups and individuals. To contact Dr. Mastria email info@Commuter-Assist.com or call 570-839-6394.
All content Copyright © 2007, Dr. Marie A. Mastria, CLC, PCC / Commuter-Assist.com. All rights reserved. You may copy or send it to family or friends who may benefit from it so long as the format and credits are intact. You have permission to publish this article electronically, free of charge, as long as the by-lines are included and links are activated and maintained. A courtesy copy of your publication or link to website would be appreciated.
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In this Sept. 17, 2014, photo, a man closes his eyes as he stands with other commuters in a crowded metro car during rush hour in Rio de Janeiro. On packed subways and crowded highways, billions of people worldwide participate in the daily commute to and from work. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

Written by: Marie A. Mastria, PhD

Time passes whether you do something with it or not, so why not make the most of it? You have to travel to work, but what goes on during that travel time is up to you. What you do with that “in between” time can be beneficial or detrimental to the rest of your day. David Clements (Future Cities Project, 2004) wondered that “commuting is ‘the life sentence,'” much akin to a jail sentence. How could we have gotten to that state, and what can we do about it? Well, we could relax, read, listen to books on tape or music, get caught up on work, start the “great American novel.” It really is up to you.

In a survey conducted by Diane Strahan of CareerBuilder, she found that thirty-six per cent of over 2,000 respondents surveyed said they would be willing to take a ten per cent or larger pay cut if they could have a shorter commute. “Workers and employers need to give more thought to their daily commute strategies and the impact commuting stress may have on their lives,” she said.

Acknowledge commute time as time for yourself. Making this adjustment in thinking has helped many commuters begin to take the stress out of the commute. Although this may sound “jargon-y,” it has been shown to lessen the stress of the commute.

How would you describe that commute time? Do you fret over it, wishing it would go away? Well, it won’t, at least not in the immediate future. So reinterpret it. Instead of thinking about the hateful commute, you might describe it as the time I have to myself to meditate, plan the day, or develop my schedule. Making only this adjustment in thinking has been a help to commuters no matter what form of transportation they use.

The Federal Highway Agency has reported that commuting time is increasing and commuters are traveling greater distances, and the trend is for both to increase. With this happening, strategies that make for a better commute become very necessary.

We all recognize that an important aspect to a balanced life is socialization, yet as our responsibilities grow and time diminishes, many of us find that our social life also diminishes. Socialization is a good way to stay healthy and connected but, as our social lives lessen, we become more prone to illness and poor health. But commuters can do something about it. Some people have become so close in their bus commutes to and from work that they celebrate important events together, like birthdays and promotions. They design on-bus book clubs. They plan to meet over the weekends. They meet and marry. There are so many ways the long commute can be used to meet our needs. If you take public transit, commuter friends offer a pleasant way to pass the time and provide good networking resources when you are looking for a new job or a good dentist.

The time spent commuting to and from work can be approached as time wasted or as an opportunity to get things done. Make a plan to use your time so it will benefit your home life and your professional life and you will have found more time in the day.

About the Author

Marie A. Mastria, PhD, of  http://www.commuterdoctors.com speaks, offers workshops, consults, provides executive, business, wellness and life coaching to groups and individuals. Email her at info@Commuter-Assist.com or call 1+570-839-6394.

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How do you change something that you have become so accustom to dreading and turn it into a positive experience and force in your life? Many of you would look at this ad think that it isn’t possible. But, in a few simple steps there is a way to turn your commute into a healthy and fulfilling experience.

So you ask, “What will I do about it?” The answer is complicated by what is realistic to do and what you are willing to do. Let’s take distance. It’s not realistic to think of how to shorten the distance if you continue to work for the same company and you are not willing or can’t change companies. So, what to do? Actually, there are a number of things that can be done to make the travel more comfortable, less taxing and even beneficial! And this is true for anything that is making the commute difficult.

Attitude, or perception, is everything. Without a good attitude, everything is harder – paying the bills, cleaning the bathroom, even traveling to work. When we look for problems, we find them. I am suggesting that the first and primary change that will help bring a good commute is working on changing your attitude toward it. Remembering that you did choose to take this job that is X miles from home actually puts you back in control of the situation and takes you out of the victim role. If you’re like most of us, you will feel empowered by using your right to choose.

A change in attitude might have you view your commute as something that you chose to undertake in order to allow you a pleasant home environment while still making an acceptable or good salary and advancing your career. Just so we are clear, the bad attitude might go something like this, “I hate driving all this way to work. I wish I could retire. What’s the use of having a nice house when I don’t have any time to spend in it?” Can you feel your shoulder muscles tighten just reading this? Alternatively, a good attitude might say, “Because I live this distance from work, I can live in this community, in a beautiful house of my choosing.” Just watch those muscles relax.

About the Author:

Dr. Marie A. Mastria has created a five step program titled, FIVE STEPS TO A BETTER COMMUTE which is available free on the Commuter-Assist website (http://www.Commuter-Assist.com).

Dr. Marie A. Mastria is founder of Commuter-Assist, which publishes e-books, CDs and cassettes to help commuters get the most out of their commute and life in general. Dr. Mastria speaks, offers workshops, and consults to businesses. She also provides life, wellness, and business coaching to groups and individuals. To contact Dr. Mastria email info@Commuter-Assist.com or call 570-839-6394.

All content Copyright © 2006, Dr. Marie A. Mastria, CLC, PCC / Commuter-Assist.com. All rights reserved. You may copy or send it to family or friends who may benefit from it so long as the format and credits are intact. You have permission to publish this article electronically, free of charge, as long as the bylines are included and links are activated and maintained. A courtesy copy of your publication or link to website would be appreciated.

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Commuting is one of those things that, if you are doing it, is something that you have to do rather than want to do. And if you have a negative attitude about your commute, it can quickly turn into something that starts to impact more than just the time you spend
commuting.

Your attitude about the commute can carry into work, home, and play. When you arrive at work already in an agitated state, you’ll need a cooling off period or your productivity will be lowered. Time is wasted preparing for the commute itself, either by having to hype yourself up or by dragging yourself down. It can also take its toll of your health, whether it is from increased stress or weight gain. Needless to say, commuting takes away from time that you would rather spend on other activities.

Wouldn’t it be nice if you actually looked forward to your commute? It may seem overwhelming to try to picture the commute in a different way, but there are resources out there to help commuters change their perspective and even turn the commute into
something positive and productive.

Following a simple program and making small changes is a great way to start turning your commute into a better experience. Programs are good because they provide structure and activities to see you through the needed steps and help you to understand
why the commute affects you adversely and how to change it.

One of the first things to do is think about what it is that drains you about the commute? Is it the time, the crowds, being away from home, fears and risks associated with traveling, or simply the boredom? In order to revert back to a time before the stress of the commute got hold of you, you first need to articulate what about the commute is draining. Then you need to do something about it.

Think of the commute as a tool that allows you to live your life in a better way. For example, instead of saying:

“I hate driving all the way to work. I wish I could retire. What’s the use of having a nice house when I don’t have any time to spend in it?”

You could say: “I commute to work so that I may live where I choose. In this way, I get the best of both worlds, a good paycheck and a good home. I even get to use my commute time in a way that increases my health and wellbeing.”

Figure out what drains you, then you can act on that and move forward to help make your commute a positive force in your life.

About the Author:

Dr. M. Mastria has created a five step program titled, FIVE STEPS TO A BETTER COMMUTE which is available free on the Commuter-Assist website (http://www.Commuter-Assist.com).

Dr. Mastria is founder of Commuter-Assist, which publishes e-books, CDs and cassettes to help commuters get the most out of their commute and life in general. Dr. Mastria speaks, offers workshops, and consults to businesses. She also provides life, wellness, and business coaching to groups and individuals. To contact Dr. Mastria email info@Commuter-Assist.com or call 570-839-6394.

All content Copyright © 2005, Dr. Marie A. Mastria, CLC, PCC / Commuter-Assist.com. All rights reserved. You may copy or send it to family or friends who may benefit from it so long as the format and credits are intact. You have permission to publish this article electronically, free of charge, as long as the bylines are included and links are activated and maintained. A courtesy copy of your publication or link to website would be appreciated.

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